Protecting a Good Idea

Delicate flower by Tyeise – innographx.com

We’ve all had them. Ideas that are special to us. Ideas that seem like they could turn into something good given enough time. It might be an idea about creating something or becoming something – but we sense that this idea is special, and has the power to be transformational for us.

A good idea is like a tiny seedling.  It is still young and delicate. It can be easily harmed, squashed, or damaged beyond repair.

Our job is to protect that idea until it has enough strength to stand alone.

So what are we protecting our idea from?

Image from typeanimals.blogspot.com.au

Elephants.

Well, that’s what I call them, anyway.

Ideas grow in a place in your mind that is much like a little garden. Your job is to keep the elephants out, because no matter whether it’s a well-meaning and friendly elephant, or an angry, rampaging, or just plain mean elephant , elephants have the capacity to stomp on your good ideas and cause irreparable damage.

Elephant foot ~ by Hoof_Lovers at flickr.com

An elephant might be a family member who says to you, “Honey, don’t be ridiculous, you’re not artistic. Didn’t we decided you were going to be a dentist? Stop being so dramatic and go finish your studies!” You deflate.  The idea is crushed beyond salvation. You cry a little when no-one is watching and then go dutifully study teeth and gums.

They might be a friend, who laughs or rolls their eyes when you share your idea with them. “That’s the stupidest thing I ever heard!” they might say as tears of laughter run down their face. You look at your idea after they’ve gone and it’s wilted and sad. Suddenly it seems hopeless to even try and revive it.

Or it might be a teacher, a room-mate, someone who you trust, a competitor, or even someone who in loving you and trying to support you still tramples on your dream. “Oh, that’s so interesting, but wouldn’t it be better if you…” Suddenly your good idea doesn’t look anything like the way it did when you started, and it just doesn’t make you feel the same way about it any more.

Worse still, they might steal it, and put it in their own garden! One day you come back to work on your idea only to find that someone else beat you to it and it’s thriving over there – and will never be yours again.

Image from pixabay.com

When an idea is tender and young you need to put a protective fence around it. Maybe you’ll need to keep it in a diary or a safe place. Maybe you’ll need to keep nurturing it in your mind. But respect this idea, cherish it, and help it to grow. Don’t invite elephants into your garden. Don’t even let them catch a glimpse.

If you love and nurture your idea it will grow. You may even find some people who can help you tend that idea, so that it strengthens and blossoms. As you get excited about it and clear about it, you’ll attract what you need to get your idea to thrive.

One day it will be strong enough and big enough that even an elephant can’t squash it. And then it will have the power to transform your life, and maybe even the lives of others.

Beautiful Tree by tomlinsonbomberger.com

Believe in your dreams. You are given them for a reason. Honour them, cherish them and trust that they have the capacity to grow into something beyond your most wondrous imagining. ♥ xx

35 thoughts on “Protecting a Good Idea

  1. Thankyou Nicole because Yes,yes this had happened to me quite alot over the years. I really have had to learn to keep my mouth shut.. I just get so damn excited and want to shout out my dreams to everyone. But I also say to people who laugh or roll their eyes ‘you know it’s my dream and it’s awesome’. I am a HUGE DREAMER** xx Luv xx

  2. Thank you! I paint and draw and it was a passion that made me very happy. However I was was told it was not good enough by someone close to me, so I believed it. That was when I was 17. Now at 42 I have finally started my art again, and discovered that the opinion of others is not the most important thing. In fact it is the “journey” I take each time I paint a canvas that is the greatest joy for my soul. Even if the finished painting is not my favorite, rather that being “an elephant” myself, and crushing my own soul, I just paint over it! So easy! I meditate, I call in spirit to join in the FUN and create for hours! No longer is it “just painting”, it is a Meditative Soul Cleansing Blissful Exercise lesson for me. How sad that I let the elephants (family, friends and me) crush something that makes me feel happiness? By the way, I even was brave enough a couple of months ago to show my paintings on my Facebook site, and the resulting comments were positively amazing! Who would have thought that ???? !!!

  3. this is wise advice, be very careful with whom you share your forming ideas, some add fertiliser and expand them, others crush them… i shared an idea with my sister recently and she ordered me a book on amazon to help expand the idea – what a gem! and totally unexpected!! wishing everyone great expansion of your fabulous ideas and the road map, skills, support and resources you need to bring them into reality!! sx

  4. Your posts always seem to speak to ME ;-) … always PERFECT timing. Thanks for the incredible info. and food for thought. I hope i come up with some good ideas. Something i’d like to do with my life where i could make money and be happy. Once you’re out of that “knock ‘em dead” mode, you just want to enjoy life … see the world, ahhhhh! Now to birth that lovely idea!!!

  5. You never fail to move me. Yesterday I shivered. Today I nod in agreement, with a smile. Those darn elephants! I have nominated you for the Very Inspiring Blogger Award. I will post the article shortly. Thank you for such wonderful words.

  6. Wise words as always Nicole. It reminded me of many situations in the past where sharing a great idea had been ruthlessly quashed! I’ll tend my little dreams til they have grown from their little acorn into strong oak trees. Huge thanks, hugs galore. Susan x

  7. I think I am my own worst elephant. I sometimes crush my own ideas even when other people are encouraging me to fulfil my dreams, because I worry I might not be able to succeed in the way that I want to. I need to have a little talk with my inner elephant. Thank you Nicole.

  8. I was about 10 when I decided I wanted to be a writer and I was ridiculed by my family, I wrote anyway but bit by bit my writingd disappeared. I found out that my mother was burning them. When I married my husband thought it a stupid idea also but I am in my 70s now and have a novel in print plus a book of poems. So dreams can come true and I have made a lot of friends who support me in all I do.

  9. Loved how you related the demoralizing forces as ELEPHANTS!:) Maybe some of us crush our beautiful garden of dreams, because we become too busy looking after and nurturing the gardens of others, our loved ones who have their expectations….

  10. Pingback: How a Garden Can Teach You To Be More Creative | Cauldrons and Cupcakes

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