Strengthening Intuition Week 6 – Sensing Energy in Food

“Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you who you are.”  ~ Brillat-Savarin

Have you been following along with our Strengthening Intuition Program so far? In today’s post I’m going to show you how to tune in to the energy of food.  This is a fun and useful skill to have – it begins to connect you much more consciously to the world around you, and you can’t help but begin to make healthier food choices as your level of awareness around food’s energy grows.

All food contains something called bio-photonic energy.  Bio-photonic energy is captured within a living cell, as a result of exposure to the sun, and to the plant or animal’s connection with the earth.  You could also consider it a form of life force that is within every living thing.

Scientists have done studies that show people with strong health emit a very high level of bio-photonic energy, and people who are ill emit much less.  It’s the same with food.  Food that is organic, wild grown and fresh emits a much stronger bio-photonic energy than factory farmed foods or foods that have been stored, processed, cooked or irradiated. (More info here and quite a technical article, but fascinating, here.)

When we eat food, the bio-photonic energy transfers from that food to our own bodies.  So the more bio-photonic energy we consume from fresh food, the healthier and more energised we become. Seems simple, huh?

Today I’m going to show you how to develop an awareness of the energy in food.  You could do this by taking yourself to a food market, or by using some of the produce and food stuffs you already have at home.

Activity:

Take a selection of foods and lay them on a table.  You might want to use some fresh fruits or vegetables, some eggs, some dried foods such as nuts or grains, and some packaged foods.  (If you are at a market or store, simply move from area to area to work with each food group.)

Begin by activating your Hand Chakras.  You can review that process in these posts:

Strengthening Intuition Week 1 – Activating your Hand Chakras

Strengthening Intuition Week 2 – Sensing Energy in Objects

Hold your hand slightly over a food item and tune in to it. (Alternatively, you could also hold the food in the palm of your hand, but I prefer to hold my hand above the item so I can tune in and then quickly move on.  This is also a better method if you want to ‘scan’ items – more about this in a moment!)

Now, back to our food item. Relax, and open your mind. When you hold your hand over the food and tune in, what do you feel:

  • Is the energy strong or weak?
  • Can you feel any heat or cold?
  • Is there any pattern of tingling or do you get any colours or images in your mind?
  • How does this food make you FEEL? Pay attention to your emotions and physical sensations.

Food with a high level of bio-photonic energy will feel ‘light’, strong, energised, make your hands warm or tingly, and create bright images, colours and sensations within your mind and body.

Food with little life force will feel ‘flat’, heavy, dead and will have weak energy. Or you won’t feel anything at all.  Fresh food that has been irradiated or stored for a long time can often feel this way.  It might look okay, but have very little energy at all.

The colour most often generated in the mind when dealing with low energy food is grey. Food that is toxic in some way can often feel quite cold, or alarmingly hot. But the heat will never feel like a good thing – more like a flame you want to take your hand away from before you get burned.

Move on now, and scan a range of different items.  Do this quite rapidly, by running your hand over the top of the items, pausing briefly over each one – you’ll notice that it won’t take long before you become quicker at tuning in.

Then come back to some fresh fruits or vegetables where you have several of the one item.  Feel the energy of each item to work out which has the strongest energy.  Was that visually noticeable too, or can you only feel the difference through your hands?

This week, experiment with sensing energy in food – using raw ingredients, packaged foods, beverages and even prepared meals. Stay open, and really allow yourself to have fun with this new level of awareness.

(*Warning – some of this might NOT be such fun, as you come to realise just how energetically ‘dead’ some of your favourite foodstuffs can be…)

Now that you can tune in to the energy of food, begin to choose foods for yourself and your family that have stronger energy and life force. The smallest changes to your eating habits will begin to have a positive effect on your overall health and well-being, and will also help you to become clearer and more energetically sensitive.

I thoroughly recommend choosing foods that lift and support your energy.  ‘Treat’ food is still okay, because you have to be able to enjoy life – but a basket full of vibrant fresh food is one of the best ways to begin feeling better, and that has to be a good thing!

Much love to you, Nicole  ♥ xx

And don’t forget that today is your last day for being in the running to win one of my  healing necklaces, hand-crafted especially for you – details here.

Virtual Vegan Potluck – Creamy Satay Hotpot Recipe

Welcome to the Virtual Vegan Potluck: bringing vegan food bloggers together to share a virtual potluck, linked by a blog circle – and our love of cooking, eating and sharing. Participating bloggers will be posting recipes – from appetizers to desserts.  Many Blessings to Annie from the wonderful blog an unrefined vegan for bringing us all together.

Links for the entire Potluck at the bottom of this post. You don’t have to be a vegan to join in – the Potluck is all about fantastic healthy recipes celebrating plant-based foods.  Something for everyone!

I have served this vegan recipe at my spiritual and psychic workshops for many years, where it is lovingly referred to as ‘Slop in a Pot’. No matter how big a quantity I make it is always gobbled up.

This dish is great grounding food (not sure what grounding is, or how to do it – click here), and it really nurtures your base, sacral and solar plexus chakras. It is also light enough energetically to allow you to make strong psychic connection while staying in that grounded space.  Needless to say, I eat this kind of food often when I am working!

It’s one of those fantastic recipes, where, once you get the hang of it, can be easily modified to suit whatever ingredients you have to hand. I have often served it to great compliment from people who had no idea (and still probably don’t!) that it was meat-free.

Note to those people with peanut allergies: I have also made this recipe with roasted macadamia nut paste in place of peanut butter. It still tasted heavenly, and the macadamias bring out a real sweetness in the dish. If you choose to use macadamias don’t use strong flavoured beans, tempeh or chick peas as the macadamia flavour will be overpowered.

Ingredients to serve four:

Sauce: One can of coconut cream, 1/2 can of water (you may need a little more), 2 tablespoons soy sauce, 2 heaped tablespoons peanut butter, 1 tablespoon palm sugar or equivalent sweetener, 2 tablespoons of your favourite curry powder, 2 large garlic cloves chopped finely, 1/2 inch of fresh root ginger grated (or use powdered ginger to taste), juice of half a lemon or lime, one sliced chilli or chilli powder to your taste (optional for those who prefer a milder flavour), one tablespoon of oil – coconut is great, but use whatever you have to hand.

Heat oil in a heavy bottomed saucepan, add garlic and ginger and cook until fragrant. Add curry powder and stir well, then pour in coconut cream.  Mix well.  Add all other sauce ingredients, stirring well after each addition.  Adjust seasoning if required. Then add water to thin down sauce. (Hint – this sauce is also delicious on its own, drizzled over steamed, baked or barbequed vegetables, or cooled and spooned over a crunchy salad – just don’t add the extra water, so that it stays thick and rich.)

Vegetables: Two washed potatoes – skin on, one large carrot, one onion, one cup each  (or your best guess) of sweet potato and pumpkin, 2 cups of quick cooking fresh seasonal vegetables such as capsicum (peppers) corn, beans, snow peas, broccoli, cauliflower etc

Additional protein: You can add a cup of cubed tofu or tempeh to this dish if you are looking to add more protein. Chickpeas also work delightfully well.

Chop all vegetables. Add root vegetables to the pot and cook for fifteen to twenty minutes on a slow simmer. Add more water if needed. Stir pot occasionally to prevent mixture sticking on the bottom. Check that the root vegetables are almost cooked before adding remainder of vegetables and any proteins that need to heat through. Cook for another five minutes or so until everything is done to your linking.  Remove from heat.

Garnish: While root vegetables are cooking dry roast a cupful of raw cashew nuts and set aside. Cut the other half of the lemon or lime into wedges. Chop some fresh coriander (cilantro) and a chilli (if you like things hot!)

Place a generous serve of rice in the bottom of a bowl, and then spoon the satay vegetables over the top.  Garnish with the toasted cashews, some coriander (cilantro) and chilli slices, and a wedge of lemon or lime. Enjoy! Namaste ♥ xx

To start at the beginning of the Virtual Vegan Potluck so that you can enjoy all the recipes and fun click here!

To visit the blog that precedes mine in the potluck click the image below:

To read the blog that follows mine in the potluck click the image below:

Vegan Recipe Bonanza!

Click on the Picture to Travel To Vegan Potluck Heaven...

Hi everyone! I’m inviting you to participate in a Virtual Vegan Potluck, hosted by the wonderful blogger an unrefined vegan on May 12, 2012.  Mark your diaries now! I’ll be contributing one of my favourite recipes, and I’m looking forward to adding a whole pile of new ones to my repertoire.

No matter what your eating style, we could all use more fruits and vegetables in our diets, and at this virtual potluck you’ll get to sample animal-product free, cruelty-free recipes for every occasion:

Course Categories
Beverages
Appetizers/Starters
Breads (Savory, such as rolls, baguette, cornbread, biscuits)
Breads (Sweet, such as banana bread, fruit muffins, cinnamon rolls)
Soups/Stews
Salads
Sides
Main Course
Desserts

If you’d like to share the love and submit a recipe of your own, go here for more details. Make sure you sign up by April 30.

It’s going to be lots of yummy, healthy fun, and should guarantee some new recipe ideas for your kitchen.  How wonderful to be connected with bloggers from all over the world, sharing our cuisine at a virtual feast of goodness and well-being. See you there!

Self Nurture in a Bowl – Easy Miso Soup

When I’m tired, or busy writing and don’t want to take too long away from the flow of words, I turn to miso soup. I can eat this stuff breakfast, lunch, dinner and all meals in between!

My soup is never a hard and fast recipe – rather it’s a technique that lets you add whatever you fancy to a simple base, and…  voila! You can whip up a tasty, easy meal in mere minutes.

This is also a recipe that adapts well to vegan, vegetarian and gluten free.

The picture above contains prawns, mushrooms and bok choi, because that’s what I had to hand. I’ll list my staples below and then give you the recipe for the soup in the picture.

Basic Ingredients: Rice, udon or other fresh or dried noodles.  (I like rice noodles for the gluten-freeness of them all!), water, miso paste – there are many types of miso, white is good if you are a miso novice, but choose the one you like the most, fresh ginger – finely chopped or grated, soy sauce or Bragg Liquid Aminos, kombu or other dried seaweed (optional).

To fancy it up use any of the following: chilli flakes, dashi or bonito flakes, sesame oil, fresh herbs such as chives, shallots (green onions) coriander, fried shallot, Japanese rice seasoning, toasted sesame seeds

Protein Ideas: tofu; green prawns (shrimp!); raw scallops; chunks of fresh raw salmon, tuna or white fish; raw oysters; steamed chicken (or you can poach it in the soup mixture)

Vegetable Suggestions: finely cut carrot battons or slices, asparagus, snow peas, bean sprouts, bok choi, pak choi, broccoli, spinach, mushrooms, firm lettuce like iceberg or cos,  or whatever is in the fridge or garden, cut finely so it will cook quickly

To make your soup, follow the directions below, no matter what your choice of ingredients.

This one (below) has noodles, mushrooms, broad beans and left-over drunken chicken at the base (under all the noodles!). I also made a vegan one that night, replacing the chicken with baked pumpkin pieces.

Easy Prawn Noodle Miso Soup: (this serves four people as a starter or two hungry people as a main) Get your ingredients ready.  Clean and de-vein your prawns. Have enough for about 1/2 a cup per person as a starter or 3/4 to one cup as a main. With big prawns this may be just two or three for a starter. Finely grate about a tablespoon of raw ginger. Allow about a cup of vegetables and enough noodles for half a serving bowl per person. I used swiss brown mushrooms and bok choi, sliced, and also a few shallots (green onions) from my garden.  Keep your vegetables in little seperate piles if the cooking time will vary.

If you are using another protein source have it chopped into small cubes or chunks. Keep all raw animal based-ingredients on their own chopping board, and wash knife and board well before cutting vegetables or tofu.

Cut all vegetables into small pieces, and finely chop any herbs you are going to add.

Prepare your noodles.  If they are dried cook in boiling water until done, drain well and add to serving bowls.  If they are fresh you can heat them in the miso broth.

Place one litre of water in a large saucepan. Add about 3 tablespoons of miso paste (you can add more later to taste if required). Stir and bring slowly to the boil.  Add in the ginger and about 2 tablespoons of soy sauce or Braggs Liquid Aminos, and a tablespoon or so of dried seaweed.  Dump in fresh noodles if they need to be heated.  Give them a minute or two in the broth and then add your prawns or other uncooked animal protein. Wait a minute and add your vegetables and/or tofu.  Don’t add the herbs/shallots yet.

Heat until vegetables are wilted.  It only takes a minute or so.  Remove from heat.  Adjust seasoning.  Add a splash of sesame oil and some chilli flakes if you like things spicy.

Ladle into bowls and add any herbs to the top. Eat.

This pic is a snack I made recently without noodles – just wakame seaweed, silken tofu and shallots in the standard miso broth. Mmmmm…..

I’m a miso soup junkie!