A Week For Divine Guidance and Inspiration – Monday Oracle 6 August 2018

“Do not neglect to show hospitality to strangers, for by doing that some have entertained angels without knowing it.” 
Holy Bible: King James Version

 

Hello, Lovelies!

August is here, bringing a delicious basket of delights. It’s a month for creativity in all forms and for getting back into the flow of life again. You’ll find a lift in your mood and a clear road ahead so get ready to make the most of the opportunities all around you.Keep that in mind as we look at the gifts of inspiration which the oracle card Guardian of Hearts brings us.

Guardian of Hearts is all about Angelic Guidance. There is so much love around us – all we ever need to do is tune in.This week call on your Guardian Angel, the Archangels and the Unnamed Angels to support you and to smooth the way in all you do. The energies of this week support moving you in healthier and more supportive directions with work, love, finances and life.

Don’t believe in Angels? Then know that the Guardian of Hearts heralds helpful people and situations in everyday life too!

It’s a card of reassurance for those of you who are going through hard times that your prayers will be heard and answered.

For some people it’s a week of you finding your calling, or of receiving Divine Inspiration or the idea that will turn your situation around. If you are an artist or creative know that the Muse with  be with you this week!

It’s also a time of heightened intuition, strong inner wisdom and of fortuitous psychic conditions. I’m leading a group of students into our Accelerated Channelling and Sacred Geometry Retreat this Friday, well supported by this week’s energies. It’s a great time for you to connect too!

Supportive crystals this week?

Ruby Zoisite (pictured) is a stone of transformation, helping you to be empowered in your life. It elevates your confidence and authority, and improves fertility, imagination and innovation. Carnelian dispels doubt and negativity, strengthening self-esteem, confidence and creativity. Apophyllite connects you to the flow of Universal wisdom and dispels doubt and fear. It also amplifies your own intuitive ability. Celestite connects you to the Angelic realms for their guidance and protection and allows for easier connection during meditation.

Helpful essential oils?

Young Living’s Joy or Believe essential oil blends, or  a combination (or singly!) of any of Grapefruit, Basil, Geranium and Sandalwood. The Joy blend is fabulous if you are feeling anxious or uncertain, or a bit sad or stuck. It’s reassuring and uplifting; wonderful for gently shifting depression and self-doubt. I often wear it as a perfume. Believe oil is a super stress-buster that boosts feel-good energies, creativity and self-esteem. It smells so uplifting and pretty too. It’s my oil of choice in my diffuser this week.

Want to make your own blend? Each of the following oils will work beautifully on their own but they also make a delicious combination for diffusing. Frankincense elevates our mood and promotes spiritual connection and intuition, Lavender keeps us in flow and relaxed, Ylang Ylang opens our hearts and is supportive when we feel anxious or overwhelmed, and Bergamot promotes joy, gratitude and optimism. To diffuse add 2 or three drops of each oil to your room or personal diffuser. You can find the oils here.

Holding you, as always, in my thoughts, prayers and meditations, and intending for you a life of abundance and joy, where you are no longer limited by your doubts.

All my love,

Nicole ❤ xx

PS: Monday’s oracle card, ‘Guardian of Hearts’, is from the Inner Child Cards – A Fairy-Tale Tarot. I use any cards shown as a prompt for channelled messages and my own own intuitive wisdom, so my take is sometimes quite different to the meaning found in a book. 

How a Garden Can Teach You To Be More Creative

fruit-apples-apple-tree

“Gardening is cheaper than therapy and you get tomatoes.”  ~ Author Unknown

Gardening is a seasonal thing.  There are tasks to do in every season, but Summer tasks can’t be easily undertaken in Winter and Winter tasks aren’t so suited to the Spring.

What does this have to do with creativity you may ask?

Why, my dear friend, everything!  Creativity has its seasons too, and once you begin to understand that you don’t need to fight against nature, you can begin to work with flow and rhythm. All creative projects follow a similar path to the seasons.  Recognising what season you’re in is the first step!

Winter

Winter is the time for rest.  It’s a dark, quiet place with the occasional storm or blizzard. But it’s from the darkness that our ideas come.  Winter is not a doing time. It’s a thinking time, a planning time, a snuggling up under the doona with a book time. You can’t force anything to grow in Winter, but it doesn’t stop you dreaming about Spring, or the harvest you’ll make come Summer.

If you are in a cold hard place creatively then treat yourself kindly.  Don’t panic.  The seasons always change. And as they do, you’ll change with them.  In the meantime, go clean out your kitchen cupboards or have a cup of tea and flick through a garden catalogue to inspire you. If inspiration does strike, well it’s fine to buy a few packets of seed, attend a class on composting, or sketch out some designs. But don’t even try to plant anything.  The garden’s not ready yet and anything you plant won’t survive and thrive in such inhospitable conditions.

Ice on a barren winter garden.

Ice on a barren winter garden. Time for dreaming, planning and getting ready for Spring.

Spring

Spring is work time!  It’s the season for setting out solid foundations. You set out your beds, dig some good compost through them, and plant out all your tender seedlings. If you only have a loose plan so far, Spring is the time where we firm up the details.  It’s also where we get the supplies we need if we didn’t take care of that in Winter. Good ideas are like those tender seedlings – they need special care.  There are some good ideas about that here: Protecting a Good Idea.

Every day or so you’ll need to come back to your garden and do some work; fertilising, weeding, watering, trailing tendrils of climbers up the trellis you have created for them.  You’ll be able to enjoy some early harvest, but mostly Spring is about setting a solid foundation for what’s to come. Get into good gardening habits. and keep learning and practicing!

Getting your garden beds ready to plant out for Spring!

There’s work to be done! Getting your garden beds ready to plant out for Spring…

Summer

A Summer garden provides a bountiful harvest.  Everything grows quickly and easily, although vigorous plants may need extra staking, and you’ll still be doing the usual jobs – feeding, weeding, tending, watering.

Some of your produce may need to be rejected or written off – a bug might get into your tomato, or a bird might eat all of your figs.  That’s the nature of gardens – they are never 100% perfection.  Gardens are always a work in progress.

The crop you had high hopes for might fail to thrive, but the butter beans you poked into the soil as an afterthought might take off in spectacular fashion providing you with never-ending buckets of delight.  Share your harvest and enjoy!

So much to harvest! Image from www.getintogardening.co.uk

So much to harvest! Image from www.getintogardening.co.uk

Autumn

In Autumn we collect seed and put it away for next spring.  There are different jobs to do now.  We’re still tending our vegetable patch, and there is still harvest, but we are spending more time mending, tidying and getting the most out of our crops. We bottle and put away produce to keep us going through winter. It’s also where we review what worked and what didn’t and what we’ll do differently next time.

Autumn is a season where we may call in some help. You might let the chooks into the garden to eat up all the slugs and grasshoppers.  You’ll start pulling out the failing plants, and a neighbour may come with a rotary hoe to churn the old plants back into the soul, nourishing your beds for next spring. You might thumb through some books to find out why your beets rotted in the ground, and how you can prevent that next time, or whether you should even be planting beets at all. You’ll feed and mulch and look after that soil so it’s ready for another productive year.

Letting the chooks (chickens for you non-Australians) into the end of season Autumn Garden.

Letting the chooks (chickens for you non-Australians) into the end of season Autumn Garden.

Creativity, like gardening, has its seasons.  Of course, you could be like some modern manufacturers and grow all your tomatoes in a hot house at maximum yield year round. That’s very productive, I’ll give you that.  But I bet you won’t be able to taste the Summer sun in those fruit, or the tang of a late frost. Seasons give their own magic to gardens and to art.  Bless ♥ xx

basket

PS: This post is part of my 2013 Creative Challenge Project.  If you’d like to read more, visit these posts:

Join my 2013 Creative Project Challenge

Creative Project Challenge – February Check In

Lost your Creative Mojo?

When the Muse vanishes – thoughts on the loss of Creativity

When the Muse vanishes – thoughts on the loss of creativity

Image from www.layoutsparks.com

Image from www.layoutsparks.com

“Creativity is our true nature; blocks are an unnatural thwarting of a process at once as normal and as miraculous as the blossoming of a flower at the end of a slender green stem.”
~ Julia Cameron 

If you’ve ever had some sort of creative block, where the juices stop flowing and the ideas dry up, then you’ll probably just find the quote above to be irritating, maddening and mocking.

Yes, we are all supposed to be creative.  Yes, creativity is meant to be our natural state.  But what happens when it’s not?  What’s wrong with us?  Why can’t we be creative like everybody else, or like we used to be?

juicingI actually believe that creativity is a little like a bicycle-powered juicer. You have to start pedalling BEFORE there can be enough power for the juice to be extracted. It’s the same with creativity – once you have some momentum up you’ll find yourself in flow, even if you weren’t there to start with.

But…

Sometimes we can’t even get on the darn bike.

Before you start gnashing your teeth, and muttering self-loathing thoughts, or committing to epic self-evaluation or a psychiatrist’s couch, ask yourself the following questions:

  • Has sleep been an issue lately?
  • Is there something on your mind?
  • Are you unwell?
  • Suffering from anxiety and/or depression?
  • Is there a situation that threatens your financial security?
  • Is there a situation that threatens your emotional well-being?
  • Are you stressed to the max, with too much on your plate?
  • Are you raising very small and demanding children (or bigger children who are going through ‘stuff’)?
  • Is there a safe and amenable place for you to practice your particular brand of creativity?
  • Have you already created something big recently?
  • Are you being creative and productive in another area as part of your work life?
  • Are you suffering from burn-out in ANY area of your life?

Sometimes we are simply just too tired, too sick, too worried, too stressed, too overwhelmed or too broken to be in a productive and creative space.

And that’s okay.

The biggest gift you can give yourself creatively when you’re in this place is time to rest and heal, and time to attend to the things that are sucking up all of your energy and head space.  Get that thesis finished.  Get that tax out of the way, or the divorce, or the bathroom finally renovated enough that you can shower and brush your teeth instead of standing outside with the garden hose.

There is a difference between ‘not feeling in the mood to create’ and being wrung out, battered, bruised and exhausted by life. Sometimes we need to rest and fill up the well before we can begin again.

Activity:

Think about what you want to create or the vision you have, or did have for a creative project.  (If you can’t even THINK of a project, then go with the desire to create rather than naming an actual project.)

Now tune in to your emotions. One a scale of one to ten how is your energy towards this project right now?

pain-scale

At 0 we are excited, motivated, happy and raring to go. We are emotionally engaged and enthusiastic about our project, and we are already sitting down and getting on with it. In fact, in the moments where we are not working on our project we find ourselves thinking about it, planning for it and wanting to get back to it.

At 10 we can’t even think of a project – it’s just a big black sucking hole, or a misty grey fog, or some other equally miserable and barren wasteland. We are flat out breathing and coping with life and that takes ALL of our energy.

What to do about it!

Strangely, one of the best medicines for a lack of creativity is creative exposure. Take some time this week to sit down with your journal and write a list of creative pursuits and activities that you have a flicker of interest for, but that are NOT your life passion.

For example, if you want to write the Next Great Novel, steer clear of anything to do with writing.  If you want to be the next prima ballerina, avoid anything to do with ballet. If you want to be a chef, stay away from food.  Are you getting the picture here?

Instead think of other cultural, artistic and creative pursuits.  Could you take up beading, chainsaw ice sculpting, macrame pot holders, hair braiding, decoupage, dancing the tango, painting some old chairs, making your own sourdough (no chefs – you guys go learn to make and fly your own kites!) etc. Do something that sounds interesting but where you don’t care whether you set the world on fire with your macrame skills or ability to compost garden scraps.

Image from www.acupfullofsunshine.blogspot.com

Image from www.acupfullofsunshine.blogspot.com.au

Make a list of music you’d like to listen to, bands you’d like to see, DVDs you’d like to watch, books to read, movies and theatre to see, galleries and cafes and markets and other places it would be interesting to visit. Think about painting those chairs on the back deck, or making a meal with a Moroccan Tagine.  Just because it’s fun.  Just because you can.

Over the next little while, dip into your list.  Don’t expect the Muse to turn up.  You don’t need her right now.  You just need some restorative time, some time with no pressure, no deadlines and no expectations.

That’s truly the meaning of Art as Therapy.  We do something a little creative and it restores a lost or damaged part of us to ourselves, so that we become fuller, more rounded, more whole.

Image by www.smashingchintz.co.uk

Image by www.smashingchintz.co.uk

This post is part of my 2013 Creative Challenge Project.  If you’d like to read more, visit these posts:

Join my 2013 Creative Project Challenge

Creative Project Challenge – February Check In

Lost your Creative Mojo?