A Day At the Farm

bunyas and beer

“I’d rather have roses on my table than diamonds on my neck.”
~ Emma Goldman

 

I slept in yesterday. Til nearly eight am. Pure luxury! I’ve had a month of restless nights thanks to Lyme disease, so to sleep so deeply and completely was bliss.

Our farm is a hive of activity right now. We’re fencing, planting, and mosaic-clearing to make way for a replanting of indigenous species to replace the camphor, privet and lantana that we’re ripping out.

That means we have a tribe of workers to feed. I’ve found that workers always work better on full stomachs. 🙂

The men started early, down in the river paddock laying water pipe to the stockyards. I cooked them breakfast when I woke up. A fry-up of our own organic sausages, green tomatoes, herbed scrambled eggs and many pots of tea.

snag and eggs

When the men went back to work I baked fruit cake, and put a pot of chicken soup on the stove. That meant dinner was sorted and my cake tin is full again.

fruitcake

Then I settled down to some writing time.

After lunch I supervised the clearing of a huge grove of bamboo right beside the carport. It’s a beautiful plant, bamboo, but a real fire hazard. Last year, when there was a bushfire miles from here, a small patch of the bamboo litter ignited from a drifting ember. Luckily we were home and able to put it out straight away. But with Australian summers the way they have been, coupled with our unpredictable rainfall, the bamboo had to go. My recent psychic experience with bushfire, and having clients who have lost farms, homes, animals and livelihoods, we aren’t game to take unnecessary risks. Ben cut out usable lengths of the bamboo and the rest will be used for mulch in the newly cleared places.

les

bamboo

To finish the day Ben and one of the men brought several wheelbarrow loads of bunya nuts up to the house, and we stood around shelling them, while the men enjoyed an after-work beer. It’s another bumper crop this year, and we sorted and weighed about twenty kilograms of bunya nut kernels to store in the deep freeze until we send them off to local restaurants or to the bush tucker wholesalers.

nuts

Of course I’ve kept ample nuts for ourselves, and there is still at least a ute load of extra nuts the size of cannonballs in the grass under the trees that we haven’t yet collected.

bunya bucket

This morning we’re off to the Mullumbimby Farmers Markets to meet friends, have a little breakfast and a good coffee, and buy good fresh bread, eggs and a basket full of fruit and vegetables.

I love the depth and variety of this life, here at the farm. And it certainly keeps me grounded for all of the other metaphysical work I do!

8 thoughts on “A Day At the Farm

  1. Sounds like a wonderful productive day! Feels good doesn’t it ? Wishing you a good sleep tonight & more days like today Nicole!

  2. wow! what do bunya nuts taste like? we don’t have them in the usa. what a busy day you had today. it sounded wonderful! i always sleep better when i’ve had a very busy day 🙂

  3. The quote by Emma Goldman struck a cord …love it . I have never heard of eating green tomatoes unless in chutney ….I learn so much from your blog and like pamelaredhead I have never heard of bunya nuts but sound yummy all the same
    You have a great life Nicole I sure it grounds you my darling.
    Cherryx

  4. I’ve been reading a tremendously interesting article in the December issue of The Sun magazine about herbal medicine. The herbalist being interviewed mentions herbs for Lyme (not sure if the same as what you are already using), as well as that he has seen plants appear on his own property that he would shortly need to treat himself. He also believes that ‘invasive’ plants show up in ecosystems for a reason–i.e., as remedies. The interviews in The Sun are usually fascinating, and this one is certainly no exception …

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