Salted Caramel Rice Pudding Recipe

“I like rice. Rice is great if you’re hungry and want 2000 of something. ” 
Mich Ehrenborg

This simple rice-based gluten-free dessert is a modern twist on a family favourite. The pudding is sweet, creamy and has that salty more-ish kick.

It can be easily made using your favourite kind of milk, so vegans and people with food intolerances can enjoy a dessert that everyone else in the household will love too. I often make this recipe with coconut milk, but have also made it with soy milk, rice milk and almond milk. It works well with cows milk too if your tummy likes that kind of milk.

The pudding can be enjoyed warm or cold.

PS – I have also been enjoying adding a few spoonfuls of collagen powder to this recipe. I have a connective tissue disorder, so adding gelatin or collagen hydrolysate to my soups, stews, smoothies and other recipes has helped me to improve my joint, cartilage and ligament health, skin elasticity, gut function, nails and hair. (Obviously, if you are a vegan you would avoid this step as collagen is an animal product.)

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup short grain white rice
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 litre of milk of your choice
  • 1/4 cup of coconut blossom sugar (If you can’t find this then use palm sugar or brown sugar)
  • 1 teaspoon of vanilla
  • 1 teaspoon of salt

Extra salt and sugar to taste. Optional: Coconut yoghurt to serve.

Method:

  1. Bring the rice and water to the boil in a large saucepan over high heat.
  2. Add milk, a little at a time, stirring well.
  3. Add sugar and stir well. If you are adding collagen powder put it on now and stir well so that it dissolves.
  4. Reduce heat and simmer for 30 minutes to one hour, stirring occasionally so that rice does not stick to bottom of pan.
  5. When rice is thick and creamy, and grains of rice are soft add vanilla and salt. Taste and then add more sugar or salt if necessary.
  6. To serve spoon into bowls. Top with a dollop of coconut yoghurt, a drizzle of cream, or your favourite fresh or canned fruits.

This will keep well, covered and refrigerated for up to four days – if it lasts that long!

 

Coconut Rice Pudding with Banana

2016-04-11 13.23.30

“And to this end they built themselves a stupendous super-computer which was so amazingly intelligent that even before its data banks had been connected up it had started from I think therefore I am and got as far as deducing the existence of rice pudding and income tax before anyone managed to turn it off.”

~ Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy

 

This is an easy and delicious pudding for people who need to eat gluten and dairy-free, but who still enjoy the occasional dessert. The pudding can also be easily made sugar-free too.

It is perfectly scrumptious served with just a sprinkle of cinnamon or nutmeg on top, but fresh banana slices and a drizzle of maple syrup make it out-of-this-world good.

Ingredients

400g coconut cream, 600ml water, 1 scant cup of uncooked white rice if jasmine or basmati or 3/4 cup of shortgrain rice (shortgrain rice has more starch and thickens better), 2 tablespoons of sugar or sugar substitute – I use Natvia (or to taste), 1 teaspoon of vanilla, pinch of salt, nutmeg or cinnamon, fresh banana and maple syrup to serve.

*note – if using brown rice use 3/4 cup, extend cooking time, and you may need to add a little more liquid

Method:

Place the coconut cream, water, sugar or sugar substitute, pinch of salt, vanilla and rice in a heavy-bottomed saucepan on the stove, over medium heat. Stir occasionally as you bring the liquid to a strong simmer (lots of bubbles but not boiling), turn down to a low simmer (just a few bubbles on the surface) and then cook for twenty to thirty minutes on low heat or until the rice is soft and most of the liquid has been absorbed or reduced. Stir every so often so that the rice doesn’t catch on the bottom of the pot and burn.  Pudding should be thick and creamy.

2016-04-11 12.43.22

2016-04-11 13.18.23

Place in bowls.

To serve plain, add just a sprinkle of nutmeg or cinnamon.

2016-04-11 13.22.15

For best results top with slices of fresh ripe banana and a little drizzle of maple syrup.

Can also be eaten cold. Store any leftovers in the fridge for up to three days.

This is so, so yummy and good.

Enjoy!

2016-04-11 13.23.30

2016-04-11 13.24.26

Easy Lemon Yoghurt Syrup Cake

2014-10-05 14.10.00

“Mma Ramotswe sighed. ‘We are all tempted, Mma. We are all tempted when it comes to cake.’

That is true,’ said Mma Potokwane sadly. ‘There are many temptations in this life, but cake is probably one of the biggest of them.”
~ Alexander McCall Smith, In the Company of Cheerful Ladies

 

This is a cake that eats well on the first day it’s baked, and keeps eating well up to a week later. It’s a dense cake, like a lemony mud cake, but it isn’t heavy or overly rich. The lemon syrup gives the cake a zesty tang, and it’s the perfect cake for travelling. I baked this early on the morning I was going to my writers retreat, whipped it out of the oven, poured the syrup over it, wrapped the whole tin in foil and carried the fragrant and still hot cake up into the mountains.

It is delicious served warm, but for our four-day retreat I stored the cake in the fridge, and served it cold. There were no complaints!

This cake can easily be made gluten-free, by substituting your favourite gluten-free flour mix. Do use fresh lemons – they make all the difference.

Cake Ingredients:

250g soft butter, 3/4 cup caster sugar, 3 eggs, finely grated rind of two large lemons (about 1 and 1/2 tablespoons), 1/4 cup of lemon juice, 1 and 1/4 cups plain greek-style yoghurt, 1/2 cup almond meal, 1 and 1/2 cups self raising flour (self-rising for my USA friends or 1 cup of all purpose flour, 1 and 1/2 x teaspoons baking powder and a pinch of salt, sifted together)

Syrup Ingredients:

1 and 1/3 cups caster sugar, 1/2 cup lemon juice, finely shredded zest of one large lemon

 

Method:

Preheat your oven to moderate (160 degree celcius fan-forced or 180 degree oven – 350 degrees fahrenheit).

Line a loaf tin (23cm x 12cm – 9 inch x 5 inch) with baking paper. (You can use a round or fluted tin if you prefer – just shorten the cooking time a little.)

 

Cream the butter, sugar and lemon rind together until creamy and light.

2014-10-03 08.14.59

Add the eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition.

Then add the remaining wet and dry ingredients and fold through gently with a spoon.

2014-10-03 08.24.49

Transfer the batter to a baking-paper lined loaf tin, and smooth the top.

Bake for around 60 minutes. Test for doneness by insert a skewer into the centre of the cake. If mixture still clings to the skewer bake a little longer.

2014-10-03 08.28.39

Check your cake after 40 minutes. If it is browning too fast place some foil on top of the cake to prevent it taking on any more colour. Don’t be too fussy with the foil, just place it gently over the top.

I was away from our farm and cooked this cake in a gas oven that is temperamental and doesn’t hold a consistent temperature, often getting too hot, or not quite getting up to temperature. Sigh. So I used foil (I usually don’t need it) and my cake also split slightly on top. Was that a drama? NO! It’s cake, people. It still looked lovely and tasted absolutely delicious. 🙂

2014-10-03 09.32.22

You can leave the cake in the pan if you are not serving it immediately. If you wish to serve while warm, wait ten minutes for cake to cool slightly and then remove from pan and place on serving plate.

Once the cake is out of the oven, make your syrup. Place the lemon juice, lemon zest and sugar in a pan over medium heat, stirring until the sugar melts. (Note: Don’t boil the syrup or it will end up tasting like marmalade and will loose its lovely zestiness!)

2014-10-03 09.31.13

Use a fine skewer and pierce holes all over the cake.

2014-10-03 09.54.00

Then pour at least half of the hot syrup over your still hot cake. I generally use all of it because I love syrupy cakes, but some of my friends prefer to keep some syrup aside in a little jug so that it can be poured onto the individual slices at serving time.

2014-10-03 09.55.45

Serve the cake in small slices, with a little cream, ice-cream or yoghurt on the side.

At the writers retreat we ate our cake with vanilla yoghurt, good coffee and lots of words.

2014-10-05 14.09.00

Here’s a piece of cake that I carried out under the wisteria in order to get a photo with natural light. I couldn’t help myself and ate some before I could even get a good shot!

The wind blew a couple of little flowers down onto my plate. I’d love to take credit for being so artful, but actually, it was nature, just doing its thing.

2014-10-05 14.12.14

 

Baked Apple Maple Custard #dairyfree #sugarfree

apple custard

“I hope there’s pudding!”
~ J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix

 

This is a comforting, warm, easy-to-digest pudding that tastes delicious. It only takes a few minutes to throw together, which is also a nice bonus. I’ve long been a fan of baked custard, and I’ve modified my grandmother’s original recipe so that it is dairy free and refined sugar-free too. You are welcome to experiment with different kinds of non-dairy milk for this recipe. I’ve tried most, and they are all good.

Being a high-protein dessert, there’s no reason why you couldn’t have this on its own as a meal. When I’m feeling tired or poorly I often do.

 

Ingredients:

2 medium apples – peeled and cut into small chunks or slices, 6 eggs, 1/2 cup coconut cream and 2 cups of your choice of soy/almond/rice milk, 3 tablespoons maple syrup or to taste, 1 teaspoon vanilla, a little coconut oil to grease dish, grated nutmeg, cinnamon.

* Note – I have also made this with 2 1/2 cups of coconut milk instead of the coconut cream and milk of your choice. If you need this recipe to be completely sugar-free it works just fine with an equivalent amount of natural sugar substitute. I use Natvia- a form of stevia – and it tastes brilliant! 

apples

Method:

  1. Preheat your oven to 150 degrees celcius or 300 degrees fahrenheit.
  2. Grease a four cup capacity dish, and find a baking tray large enough for it to sit within.
  3. Beat eggs, coconut cream, maple syrup, vanilla and milk together with a whisk or fork.
  4. Place apple in bottom of dish and sprinkle with a teaspoon of cinnamon. Pour egg mixture into the greased dish. Don’t panic when the apple rises from the bottom. It’s meant to!
  5. Grate or sprinkle nutmeg over the top of the custard. (I am a firm lover of fresh nutmeg – once you’ve tried it you’ll never go back to the packaged stuff!) maple custard
  6. Fill baking tray with cold water so that it comes halfway up the side of the custard dish.
  7. Place carefully into oven and bake for 40 to 60 minutes or until set.  Custard will be firm under your touch, although it may still be a bit wobbly in the middle.  It will firm more as it cools.

*Note: Oven temperatures vary widely. You need to cook this slowly to be rewarded with a thick, well set dish. If it is cooked at too high a temperature you will have lots of bubbles in your custard. Unless you have used low temperatures in your oven before, you need to check your custard after thirty minutes. After thirty minutes, if the custard has not picked up some colour and begun to set, your oven is too slow and you will need to adjust the temperature up a little. When I cook this at my farm in my Falcon Oven which is fan-forced electric, it takes 40 minutes to bake my custard. When I cook this dish in the city, my old gas oven takes 60 minutes.

Serve hot or cold. The apple will now be soft and moist with a little caramelisation on the top of your dessert. Beneath a light fluffy layer will be a dense rich egg custard that is velvety smooth. Scrumptious!

eating custard

Apple, Pear and Chia Seed Warm Pudding Recipe

2014-04-11 18.26.35

“Life is uncertain. Eat dessert first.” ~Ernestine Ulmer

 

I came home to our farm last night, too exhausted to cook dinner.

Problem was, I was hungry.

The thought of a salad, or anything cold and raw was completely off-putting. I needed warmth and nurture.

Solution? A lovely bowl of warm pudding – healthy and delicious but creamy and sweet enough to feel like an indulgence. This easy-to-digest meal is gluten-free, dairy-free and vegan. Perfect for those with dietary restrictions, to tempt a fussy eater or for someone who’s unwell. And the coolest thing about this recipe is that it makes an outstanding breakfast too!

The apple and pear give sweetness and texture to this comforting pudding.

Chia seeds are often touted as a superfood. I have to agree. They are high protein, high fibre, gluten-free, packed full of omega 3 fatty acids, potassium, calcium, Vitamin C, iron and anti-oxidants, plus they help heal the digestive tract and stabilise blood sugar. Win!

Ingredients for four serves:

Two ripe pears; two apples; 2 tablespoons of water; 1 heaped teaspoon of cinnamon; zest of a lemon; juice of half a lemon; 2 teaspoons of natvia, honey, maple syrup or other sweetener of your choice; 2 heaped tablespoons of chia seeds; 1 and a half cups of water; coconut cream and a little extra maple syrup to serve.

Note: It’s also fine to use four pears or four apples, depending on what’s in your pantry or on your list of available foods if you are working with dietary restrictions.

Method:

Place the chia seeds and the cup and a half of water in a bowl. Stir and leave to swell for twenty minutes. Stir occasionally to avoid clumping. The seeds will absorb the water and produce a jelly-like substance. (Try not to think about the fact that right now it looks like a bowl of frog spawn!)

chia_seeds_in_liquid

Dice pears and apple. Add to a saucepan over medium heat with two tablespoons of water and the cinnamon, lemon zest and juice. Stir for a few minutes until the fruit softens. Now pour in the chia seed mixture, which will have a runny jelly-like consistency.

Stir well over medium heat until the mixture is thick and warm – about five minutes. Add a little sweetener to taste.

2014-04-11 18.16.15

Spoon into serving bowls and add a generous dollop of coconut cream. Drizzle a little maple syrup over the top.

Devour happily.

2014-04-11 18.29.10

Any leftovers can be stored in fridge for up to three days. Try spooning the mixture into glasses, layering with a little yogurt or coconut cream to enjoy cold tomorrow as a breakfast parfait. The pudding also reheats well. Just use gentle heat and add the coconut cream in before you heat it!

2014-04-11 18.30.46

Easy Strawberry and Mulberry Teacake Recipe with Berry Compote

Strawberry and Mulberr eacake with Berry Compote and Icecream

Strawberry and Mulberry Teacake with Berry Compote and Ice Cream

“You’ve got this life and while you’ve got it, you’d better kiss like you only have one moment, try to hold someone’s hand like you will never get another chance to, look into people’s eyes like they’re the last you’ll ever see, watch someone sleeping like there’s no time left, jump if you feel like jumping, run if you feel like running, play music in your head when there is none, and eat cake like it’s the only one left in the world!” 
― C. JoyBell C.

I don’t need much of an excuse to bake a cake. And now, while the mulberry tree is weighted down with dark sweet fruit, and my heritage strawberries are dripping berries, it seems only sensible to include them in my baking.

This cake can be made and eaten as a tea cake – it’s dense and buttery and not too sweet, making it wonderful for afternoon tea. If you like you could have it sliced with a scrape of butter, or get a little fancy and drizzle some lemony icing over the top. It’s equally delicious warm or cold.

Don’t panic if you’re not much of a baker – this recipe is dead easy.

I chose to bake my cake in the afternoon and let it cool for dinner, then served it with a simple warm berry compote and vanilla ice-cream. You have no idea how much willpower it took to not taste a corner while it was cooling.

There was plenty for the next day too. Leftovers always make me happy! Just remember to refrigerate any cake you don’t eat, as the soft berries mean the cake will only keep for three to four days.

If you don’t have access to fresh berries, frozen ones will work just fine. And the combination is really up to you. I’m just using strawberries and mulberries because that’s what’s ripe at my farm right now.

Serving up dessert at my low-key kitchen table dinner with the neighbours.

Serving up dessert at my low-key kitchen table dinner with the neighbours.

Cake Ingredients:

70g x (5 tablespoons) softened butter, 2 x teaspoons vanilla extract, 1 x egg, 1/2 x cup sugar, 1 x cup self raising (self-rising for my USA friends or 1 cup of all purpose flour, 1 and 1/2 x teaspoons baking powder and a pinch of salt, sifted together), 1/3 cup plain yogurt, 2 cups of berries, grated zest of one lemon.  1 x bundt pan well greased with butter or 1 x 20cm round cake tin, paper lined.

*Note: This cake also bakes up well using a commercially prepared gluten-free flour mix.

Method:

Preheat oven to moderate (160 degree celcius fan-forced or 180 degree oven – 350 degrees fahrenheit). Prepare your cake tin.

Wash berries, remove any hulls or stems and drain well. (I pat mine dry in paper towel.)

2013-09-13 12.19.48

Strawberries and mulberries from the garden!

Place butter and sugar in bowl and beat until thick and creamy (about 2 minutes). Then add in the egg, lemon zest, vanilla and beat again until thick and well combined. I use an electric mixer for this first part.

Fold through the yoghurt and flour with a spoon. Then gently fold in the berries.

Pretty cake batter ready for the pan

Pretty cake batter ready for the pan

Then carefully dollop your cake batter into your prepared pan and smooth the top with the back of a spoon.

sometimg useful

I love how the creamy batter is streaked pink and purple from the berry juices.

Place in the preheated oven and cook for 25 to 30 minutes.  Check your cake by poking  a skewer into the centre at 25 minutes. If it comes out clean it is ready. Leave in a little longer if batter still clings to skewer.

Cool in tin for five minutes, then give it a shake to loosen it and invert onto a serving plate. There might be a few gooey soft berries on the top of the cake, which is part of its rustic charm.

The finished cake, cooling on my windowsill.

The finished cake, cooling on my windowsill.

Compote Ingredients:

2 heaped cups of berries, 2 tablespoons of icing sugar (confectioner’s sugar), 2 tablespoons of fresh lemon juice

Method:

Place the berries, sugar and lemon juice on a saucepan over low heat. Squash the berries slightly with a potato masher to release some of the juice.

2013-09-13 19.04.29

Blurry action shot of the berries being smashed up to make them juicy.

Heat until the berries become syrupy – which takes just a minute or two. Serve over the sliced cake.

This compote is also delicious over porridge, ice cream, pancakes or waffles. Enjoy!

Did I mention yummy? Yummy!

Did I mention yummy? Yummy!

Nana’s Passionfruit Slice Recipe

2013-04-29 19.31.42

“Cooking is not about being the best or most perfect cook, but rather it is about sharing the table with family and friends.”  ~ Skye Gyngell, My Favorite Ingredients

This is an old recipe that my Nana copied out from her friend Dulcie, after a successful ‘War Wives Luncheon’ during World War Two. At least that was the memorable annotation she jotted at the bottom of the piece of paper the recipe is written on.  As a child I would ask Nana over and over to tell me about that Luncheon in Sydney, and she would remind me how hard it was to make tasty food with all of the rationing and restrictions. Dulcie’s slice had been a real winner.

As a child I painstakingly copied the same recipe into the Family Recipe Book.  Each time I make this I think of my Nana and her friends, sitting drinking cups of tea, eating slice and chatting during the long days of the War, with the rations and limitations and hardships.

There’s a lot of comfort to be had in a cup of tea and a slice.

tea in front of the fire

Base Ingredients:

1 x cup of self raising flour (self-rising for my USA friends or 1 cup of all purpose flour, 1 and 1/2 x teaspoons baking powder and a pinch of salt, sifted together), 1 x cup of unsweetened desiccated coconut, 1/2 cup of  sugar, 1/2 cup (4 oz or 125 grams) melted butter, finely grated zest of one lemon.

*Note –  If you’re gluten intolerant, this works fine with a commercial gluten-free flour mix.

Method:

Preheat oven to moderate (160 degree celcius fan-forced or 180 degree oven – 350 degrees fahrenheit).

Line a 28cm x 18cm (7 inch by 11 inch) slice tin with some baking paper.

Measure the dry ingredients into a large bowl and then mix through the melted butter.  The mixture should be moist and crumbly.

Press the base into the tin, being careful not to press down too heavily. (If you compact the base too much it becomes very hard to cut after it has cooked.)

Bake for 10 to 12 minutes, or until the top is nicely golden.

Remove from oven and cool completely. (This step is essential!)

2013-04-29 10.57.57

Topping:

1 x 395g can of sweetened condensed milk, 1/2 cup of fresh lemon juice, pulp of 3 passionfruit.

Heat oven to moderate (160 degree celcius fan-forced or 180 degree oven – 350 degrees fahrenheit), and then just before you pop the slice back in, knock the temperature back to 140 degrees for your fan forced oven or equivalent.

passfruits

Whisk the condensed milk, lemon juice and passionfruit pulp together.  The mixture will thicken from the acidity of the lemon juice. At this stage you should taste it… (Okay, I made that bit up, but who can resist?)

Pour the passionfruit topping over the biscuit base and smooth over until you have a good coverage.

2013-04-29 15.07.03

Bake in the slow oven for twenty minutes. The topping should be firm to your touch, and pale golden.

Remove from oven and cool completely.  Store in refrigerator in a hot climate, or if you are not eating this all in one day.  To serve, cut into small squares.

2013-04-29 19.30.57

Marga’s Orange Syrup Cake Recipe

We’re picking the last of our organic oranges before the heat of summer sets in, and I know a perfect way to use some of them up: my maternal grandmother’s orange syrup cake recipe.  Marga gave this recipe to me when I held my first proper dinner party – a rural affair at my college share-house, where the boys were so delighted to be invited to ‘Roast Dinner and Dessert’ that they scrubbed up and wore ties!

This is a beautiful, moist and flavoursome cake, that is easy to make, keeps well and is a little bit special. It’s just perfect as a dessert, or as the star of an afternoon tea.  I served one of these cakes recently at a friend’s 40th birthday picnic, with glasses of celebratory champagne and fresh orange juice.

*You can tell by the name that this cake is going to be one massive natural and refined sugar fix, so if that’s an issue, please avert your eyes. It’s also the reason this is one of my ‘special occasion’ cakes.

Ingredients:

Cake:  1 orange – grate rind finely and then juice fruit and set both aside, 3 eggs, 1 cup caster sugar (superfine sugar), 1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks or 225 grams), 1 and 1/2 cups self raising flour, 2 tablespoons sweet orange marmalade (I was lucky enough to have some of my neighbour’s amazing organic orange marmalade left in my pantry.  Thanks Richard! xx)

Syrup: 1 orange – grate rind finely and then juice fruit and set both aside, 1 cup of pure icing sugar (confectioners sugar) . You can also add one tablespoon of Cointreau or Grand Marnier Liqueur for an adults-only version with a little more kick.

Yoghurt: 1 cup of natural yoghurt, 1 to 2 tablespoons honey (use to your taste)

A few extra oranges to segment as a garnish…

Method:

Preheat your oven to 180 degrees celcius (moderate or 355F) or slightly less (I use 160 degrees) if it is fan forced.

Choose a tin.  It looks pretty for a special occasion in a fluted ring tin, or you can make it in a 24cm round tin, a loaf tin, or two smaller tins.  The pictures of my effort show one loaf tin and two smaller rectangular tins because I made a double batch. (I always make a double batch…)  Grease your tin well, or line with baking paper

Grate the rind from your first orange, and then juice it and set both aside.  Beat your butter and sugar together with an electric beater until your mixture is pale and creamy and the sugar has dissolved.  Then add eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition. Add in your marmalade and rind and beat again.  Then alternately fold the sifted flour and orange juice, working them gently together until combined.

Now gently spoon the cake mix into your prepared tins, pushing it well into the edges.  Wash your hands and then use your wet palm to smooth off the surface of the cake, and to spread the mixture uniformly across the pan.

Bake for forty five to fifty minutes, or until a skewer comes out clean.  After twenty (smaller tins) to thirty minutes (larger tins) uncovered, and then lightly cover the tin with foil to prevent the tops over-browning.

While the cake is cooking, prepare your syrup by finely grating the rind of another orange, juicing it, and adding these to one cup of pure icing sugar. (If you are using alcohol, also add this in now.)  Stir with a spoon until the sugar has dissolved and then set aside.

For your garnish, segment some more oranges and keep on a plate, and then combine your honey and yoghurt together in a bowl.

When the cake/cakes are removed from the oven allow them to stand for ten minutes in their tin.  If you remove them sooner they have a tendency to break! Don’t be alarmed if they have sunk a little in the middle.  They sometimes do in a larger tin. After cooling a little place your cake onto the serving plate and then spoon or brush the syrup over until it has all been absorbed. Arrange segmented oranges on the top for a pretty affect.

If you intend on serving the cake cold, or at a later time, then go ahead and pour the syrup over it while it is in the tin, but do this bit by bit rather than all in a rush.  Then let it cool in the tin, all syrupy and good.

To serve, slice your cake, add some honey yoghurt and a few orange segments and enjoy!

Variations:  Substitute 1/2 cup of almond meal for 1/2 cup of flour (no more or it becomes stodge!)  You can also use a packaged gluten-free self rising flour.  The cake will have a slightly heavier texture, but that is perfectly fine for a syrup cake.

PS: If you really want to honour my wonderful grandmother, eat a little slice for breakfast the next morning with a cup of coffee.  Cook’s privilege, she always told me.  ♥ xx

Lemon Delicious Pudding Recipe

Lemon Delicious Pudding – a bowl full of heaven!

My Meyer Lemon tree is dripping with ripe fruit right now, and this pudding is a perfect way to use some of them up.  The pudding is served warm, and is light enough to be enjoyed all year round.  If you are lucky enough to have any left over it is also tasty eaten cold!

My Grandmother’s recipe from my old book…

The picture above is from my book of treasured recipes.  As you can see by the stains, it is a well-used and well-loved little book, with pages of recipes from family and friends.  This particular recipe comes from my mum’s mother, Margaret Nurcombe, known to us as Marga, rather than Grandmother. Marga passed away just over a year ago, but every time I smell a gardenia, see my Meyer Lemon tree (she had an enormous one in her back yard too!) or make this pudding, I think of her.

Ingredients to serve four:

3 eggs, 1/2 cup of sugar, 1 cup of milk, 1 tablespoon self raising flour (for my American friends, you can make self raising flour by adding 1 and 1/2 teaspoons baking powder and 1/2 teaspoon salt to one cup of all purpose cake flour), 1 tablespoon of lemon zest, 1/2 cup of lemon juice, 1 tablespoon of sugar extra.

The recipe can be easily doubled to feed a larger crowd.  I have also made this with gluten-free flour very successfully.

Method:

Prepare your lemon zest, and then your lemon juice and set aside.

Juicy Meyer Lemons from my farm

Preheat your oven to 180C (moderate or 355F) or slightly less if it is fan forced.

Separate your eggs, and place the yolks and sugar in a large bowl.  Beat until thick and creamy, making sure the sugar has dissolved.  You can still see the sugar granules in this picture, which means it’s not quite ready.

Beat egg and sugar until the mixture is rich and creamy and thick.

Add the milk, lemon juice and rind and beat on low speed to combine, then add the flour and mix through.  Yes, it is only 1 tablespoon of flour – I know it doesn’t seem like much, but the texture of this pudding is like a sponge or a souffle – you want it to be light!

Clean your beaters to make sure there is no trace of yolk left on them (which would prevent your egg whites from beating up nicely).  Beat your egg whites in a separate bowl until soft peaks form.  Add the extra tablespoon of sugar and beat again until the sugar is dissolved.

Fold the egg whites gently through the lemon mixture, until they are just combined.  Be gentle with this bit!

Gently fold egg white through the lemon mixture…

Pour into a greased dish, and set the dish in a pan of cold water. Bake for 50 minutes.  The top will rise like a sponge cake, but underneath there will still be a tangy sweet lemon sauce.

Pudding in water bath, ready to go into the oven.

It smells heavenly when it comes out of the oven…

Nicely browned on top!

But the real magic happens when you take a spoon and cut into it.

The pudding makes its own lemony sauce!

Lemon Delicious Pudding is delightful on its own, but is also well teamed with a good vanilla ice-cream.  I hope you enjoy this recipe as much as my family does.  It’s so easy to prepare, and it is one of my all-time favourites! ♥

Best Easy Stewed Rhubarb Recipe

Stewed Rhubarb served with Baked Custard. Delish!

As much as I am grateful for gratitude (and my 30 Day Gratitude Challenge) I am also currently very grateful for rhubarb – and I don’t think I can last another 2 weeks without some sort of food post.  So here it is – Blissful Best Rhubarb!

Ingredients: fresh rhubarb, raw sugar, lemon

Method:  Wash rhubarb stems and remove ends and leaves. Cut into inch-long chunks. Weigh your finished amount.  Throw rhubarb into a saucepan and add 20% of the weight of the rhubarb in raw sugar to the pot as well.  Then add a sqeeze of fresh lemon.

Now stir over low heat, and then cover.  Remove lid and stir occasionally so it doesn’t stick – don’t have your heat up too high or it will!

The rhubarb will cook down in its own juices, and that will take ten to fifteen minutes depending on how much you have, and how hot your pot is!

Finish with another small squeeze of lemon. The rhubarb will now be soft, with a few large chunks left, and that lovely sweet/tart pink stringy goodness.

Serve with fresh cream, ice-cream or my favourite – baked custard.  If you’re lucky enough to have left-overs this will brighten up any breakfast cereal and also goes well with yoghurt.  Enjoy!

PS  – Here’s my delicious baked custard recipe here