The wisdom of planting trees

IMG00051-20090823-1632

“Trees are the best monuments that a man can erect to his own memory. They speak his praises without flattery, and they are blessings to children yet unborn.”

~ Lord Orrery, 1749

 

Our humble little farmhouse was built firstly as a two room cottage in 1860 by the original timber-cutter in our area. The walls and ceilings are cedar, the floors are pine. Later, at the turn of last century, the house was added to again, with stone and teak and other found and reclaimed bits of timber.

The land all around was cleared of trees, and the rocks in the paddocks were piled up into stone fences. All was bare and orderly.

d1_09774r

But then someone planted trees again. Trees that they would never live to see grow to maturity.

Now our farm is graced with majestic Fig and Teak trees, enormous Hoop Pines, Bunya Pines, Sydney Blue Gums and a grove of ancient and delicious citrus trees.

There’s a beautiful Magnolia, a giant Jacaranda and some ancient palms.

Trees have turned this bare earth back into a home, and they cradle us in their energy.

Bangalow FM sept09 001

That’s the thing about planting trees. You need to hold a longer-term vision for yourself, and for the world. You need to have faith in a future you may never see.

The gifts of that farmer’s long-term vision are that we are surrounded by enormous old trees that provide shade and protection for us, and countless critters.

And now we’ve added to this vision by planting apples and pears, peaches and nectarines, mulberries, loquats and avocado trees.

hoop pine

Don’t be afraid to take on big projects. Don’t be afraid to create things, plant things, or start things for which you may never see an end result.

Good things often take time – gardens, quilts, novels, gigantic lego projects, renovations, study, building things…

Your faith in a brighter future is what changes the world, and makes it more meaningful and more beautiful for the rest of us.

What seeds can you plant today? What dreams can you give birth to?

I dare you!

tree1

12 thoughts on “The wisdom of planting trees

  1. Trees our life, how beautiful are your trees NC. Such a blessing, today’s post has grabbed me, yes I love trees but the thing that jumped out and echoed in my head is your dare! Yes it is time I am ready to begin.

  2. Love this post Nicole – we are all just a short walk or drive away from a garden or grove that is testament to the vision held by a creative soul who could see the bigger picture for their project a couple of centuries ago. I’m in awe when these projects are maintained or lovingly restored for present generations to admire, draw inspiration from or just revel in the energy or refuge they provide. Also, thank you for the challenge – I’m in!

  3. We are building our dream house in a beautiful area of West Wales there are huge trees at the bottom of our garden. Last year , here in England , we had a dreadful summer , and what little sun we had we had a little winge that the trees blocked it out. This year we are having a heat wave and are thankful for shade and beauty they give us .
    I have always loved trees and hate people who chop them down with little thought . Your wondful post , Nicole , has heightened my awareness of their wonderful creation ..thank you. Cherry xx

  4. I love trees Nicole, and yours look gorgeous.
    A couple of years ago, the council did a tree planting process along the footpath verge & invited community members to be part of the planting, My girls & I joined in and we had a fun day of planting.
    I have such pleasure driving past these lovely trees which are growing bigger each year. I also love that occasionally when we walk past them, the girls will remember that we planted them and they also feel satisfied with what we created.
    I sometimes think about trees I’ve planted in the past which I no longer see & wonder how they are going…
    Hugs to you xx

  5. When my husband and I bought our first home in 2005 in Eugene, Oregon I set about to plant a
    “backyard” orchard in the front yard. I planted 5 apple trees and 2 plum trees, 4 cherry trees, 2 pears and a nectarine, a frost peach and an apricot. this year is the first year that i am getting an apricot crop. the tree is loaded! and the peach tree is too. so i have been very patient! we have a bad bug that is infected all soft fruit crops in our area, but i just cut off the “bad” parts and throw them in the freezer to kill the bug and then compost them after a few days in the freezer. i often think about the people that will live in our home after we are long gone and wonder if they will appreciate and care for my little orchard! it is a lot of work to keep up with all of the trees that i have planted, but the reward with tree ripened fruit is worth all of my effort. thank you for your post nicole and i am so happy that someone has the foresight to bless you with your trees! xoxo pamela

  6. I am a teacher in a remote indigenous school in the NT. Your posts about your time in the Kimberley resonate with me greatly. I have recently begun a project to rear chickens and start a permaculture food forrest but have been worried that my efforts will be for nothing if I leave and the projects aren’t followed up. I am reminded that our actions can have far reaching effects and that we should not be concerned with the results that we see now, but the possibilities for tomorrow. If even just one student remembers what we have done together and uses this in their future lives then our efforts are not for nothing. Thank you!

Leave a Reply